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\”One or Multiple Audio Files have changed in length\” — FIX!! — Logic Pro
\”One or Multiple Audio Files have changed in length\” — FIX!! — Logic Pro


‘One or more audio files changed in length’ – Logic Pro – Logic Pro Help

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about ‘One or more audio files changed in length’ – Logic Pro – Logic Pro Help Sounds like you’re changing your I/O Buffer Size. The sample rate is not a preference but a project setting (File > Project Settings > Audio). …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for ‘One or more audio files changed in length’ – Logic Pro – Logic Pro Help Sounds like you’re changing your I/O Buffer Size. The sample rate is not a preference but a project setting (File > Project Settings > Audio). Hi there I read the previous posts on this topic but was slightly confused by some of the terminology. I had 4 big projects with lots of audio and software instruments. They were alternate versions, which I have worked on for months. I bounced them into MP3’s before I went on holiday. I came back…
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'One or more audio files changed in length' - Logic Pro - Logic Pro Help
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One or more audio files changed in length! – Apple Community

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One or more audio files changed in length! - Apple Community
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Logic Pro 9 – One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length | Logic Users Group

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Logic Pro 9 – One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length | Logic Users Group One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length As a result, 65 audio regions changed in length or content position. …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for Logic Pro 9 – One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length | Logic Users Group One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length As a result, 65 audio regions changed in length or content position. I mistakenly began a recent project at 44.1k. After realizing my error I copied and converted the files in the bin to 48k in a new folder and changed the…
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Logic Pro 9 - One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length | Logic Users Group
Logic Pro 9 – One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length | Logic Users Group

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When Logic Destroys Your Audio Files | Dave’s Blog

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    When Logic Destroys Your Audio Files | Dave’s Blog And just to add, yes, I got the message “One or more audio files changed in length!” At first it was 24, then later it turned into 36, but all …
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Notes Regarding AIFF Files

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When Logic Destroys Your Audio Files | Dave's Blog
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recording – Audio files/regions randomly changed in length on garageband – Music: Practice & Theory Stack Exchange

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about macProVideo.com Get smart next time you’re working with audio files in Logic Pro … and avo these … without actually changing the data in the original audio recording. …
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How to put multiple audio files into one – Quora

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How to put multiple audio files into one - Quora
How to put multiple audio files into one – Quora

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Logic Pro X – importing audio file changes the length of it! | MacRumors Forums

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Logic Pro X – importing audio file changes the length of it! | MacRumors Forums I had on one track my 4 minute microphone recording. … know what setting to use so that future audio files import at their actual length. …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for Logic Pro X – importing audio file changes the length of it! | MacRumors Forums I had on one track my 4 minute microphone recording. … know what setting to use so that future audio files import at their actual length. Driving me nuts this, though it could be an easy fix but nothing online worked. I had on one track my 4 minute microphone recording. Then I wanted on a…
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Logic Pro X - importing audio file changes the length of it! | MacRumors Forums
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One or more audio files changed in length!

Logic Pro X 10.4.1

Mac OS X 10.12.6

I cannot save or copy any Logic Pro X projects. Every once in a while, about 25% of the audio regions in the project will point at the wrong samples, or at different times in the samples. I will get the error “One or more audio files changed in length!”.

If I move a Project.logicx file to another directory, or to another disk, I risk destroying the project. If I create an entirely new project, record new takes, and save it, there is a chance that about 25% of the audio takes will be completely ruined.

I spent money on native Apple tools, because they are known for good support and reliability. Where is Logic support? Is there a human being I can talk to? I can “Create Support File…” in Logic Pro, but I don’t know where I would send it. I’m looking at $2,000 worth of audio engineering gear, and a silent abyss.

Logic Pro 9 – One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length

I mistakenly began a recent project at 44.1k. After realizing my error I copied and converted the files in the bin to 48k in a new folder and changed the audio setting in Logic and my Hardware to reflect the new sample rate. Everything seemed fine and I continued with the song throughout the day. Today when I reopened the project I get the following message:

One or Multiple Audio Files Changed in Length

As a result, 65 audio regions changed in length or content position.

And sure enough, that is true. The regions are all out of time and I can’t figure out how to fix it. When I look in the bin, the files are all 44.1k. How can I get it back to how it was? I suppose I could start a new project with all the converted files, redo my edits, plugins and automation but man if that doesn’t sound like a loss of a day.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

When Logic Destroys Your Audio Files

This post is about a serious bug in Logic, which causes audio files to be damaged. The symptom of this bug is the following error message when opening a previously perfectly working project: One or more audio files changed in length.

Background

This is how I encountered the bug: we had recording sessions with our band and had completed the first session. In the studio, we could listen to all tracks without any problems. After some time, when our sound engineer opened the project again, he encountered the error message above for some files. After listening through the projects, he discovered that a large number of audio clips could not be played back anymore. We had one backup of the project we had made right after the recording session, but unfortunately it contained the same corrupted files. This meant that we had to repeat the recording session 🙁

We had a few more recording sessions, after which we made 3 or 4 backups right away. After we had recorded a whole album, the issue occurred again. The files were corrupted on all backups again, although we could listen to the tracks in the studio without problems. Consequently, the data was corrupted after the recording and before re-opening the Logic project.

Then, our sound engineer noticed the following: when he opened a project for the first time, logic reported 4 corrupted files. When opening the same project again, suddenly 24 files were corrupted. This leads to the conclusion that Logic itself is responsible for destroying the audio files.

Conditions under Which the Bug Occurs

The exact conditions under which the error occurs are not exactly clear, but one of the following things or a combination of those things seems to be involved:

Using hard drives or SSDs that are not formatted with an Apple File system (i.e. Mac OS X Journaled or APFS)

Using external (hard) drives

Using the Comping Feature in Logic (the one where you see multiple takes stacked on each other and can combine them to an “optimal” take)

The files are damaged when logic is closed, which means that even if the project works perfectly before closing the application, there is no guarantee that it will work when opened again.

We experienced these problems with Logic 9, but internet forum posts suggest that it can also happen with Logic Pro X. If someone can confirm, knows the exact error conditions or has any updates, please feel free to comment.

Error Analysis

Logic destroys the audio files in seemingly random order, e.g. in a sequence of 79 audio files recorded for one track the files with numbers 43, 48, 56, 57, 58, 59, 65, 74 and 79 were corrupted.

For a more thorough analysis, I compared working files with corrupted files using a Hex editor, in which each single byte in the file can be visualized in hexadecimal representation. The first bytes of an intact wave file look like this:

For a detailed description of each byte, refer to this page. In short, these are the contents of the wave file header:

Bytes 1-4: RIFF chunk descriptor

Bytes 5-8: chuck size (total number of bytes in the file after this block)

Bytes 9-12: format (in this case WAVE )

) Bytes 13-16: fmt-subchunk header (contains fmt )

) Bytes 17-20: subchunk 1 size (in this case 16 for PCM)

for PCM) Bytes 21-22: audio format ( 1 = PCM)

= PCM) Bytes 23-24: number of channels ( 1 = Mono, 2 = Stereo, etc.)

= Mono, = Stereo, etc.) Bytes 25-28: sample rate (e.g. 44,100 Hz)

Bytes 29-32: byte rate: number of bytes required to store 1 second of audio for all channels (= sample rate * number of channels * bits per sample / 8 )

) Bytes 33-34: block align: number of bytes required to store one sample in all channels (= number of channels * bits per sample / 8 )

) Bytes 34-36: resolution in bits per sample, e.g. 8 , 16 or 24 bits

, or bits Bytes 37-40: data chunk header (contains data )

) Bytes 41-44: number of bytes representing the raw audio data

Bytes 45ff.: raw audio data

Now let’s have a look at a destroyed audio file:

If the bug occurs, Logic fails to write the wave header correctly. Instead, the file contains only zeroes in the first 44 bytes, which is exactly the length of the wave header. The good news: the raw audio data, starting at byte 45, is still intact (note that the hex editor starts counting bytes at index 0).

If such a corrupted wave file is opened, logic can’t read the header and assumes a default 8 bit setting, which leads to a misinterpretation of the audio data. Consequently, the length of the file will also be misinterpreted. Furthermore, the interpretation will be even more off because a wrong sample rate is assumed. Not good.

Repairing the Audio Files

As a preliminary fix, you can restore the destroyed files by copying a wave file header (i.e. the first 44 bytes) from a correct file (with matching sample rate and bit depth) to a corrupted file in a hex editor.

Update August 29, 2019: It was confirmed that this also works for AIFF files. In this case, the first 512 bytes have to be copied. Thank you very much to Sawyer Wildgen for sharing this!

A wave file header specifying a sample rate of 44.100 Hz and 24 bit resolution starts with bytes similar to these (in hexadecimal representation):

1 52 49 46 46 5B 89 3E 00 57 41 56 45 66 6D 74 20 10 00 00 00 01 00 01 00 44 AC 00 00 CC 04 02 00 03 00 18 00 64 61 74 61 6B 5C 3E 00 52 49 46 46 5B 89 3E 00 57 41 56 45 66 6D 74 20 10 00 00 00 01 00 01 00 44 AC 00 00 CC 04 02 00 03 00 18 00 64 61 74 61 6B 5C 3E 00

However, one potential issue now could still be that the (sub)chunk sizes (bytes 5-8 and 41-44) are not correct, but most audio editors don’t check these values. If you want to correct these as well, make sure that you use the correct little endian representation for these byte groups. This means the byte order is reversed. A complete example is given below.

The formulas to calculate the correct values for WAVE files are:

chunk size = – 8

data chunk size = – 44

Integer to Little Endian Hex Conversion

Example: Converting the number 44,100 to a little endian hex number:

Convert number to hex using a scientific calculator or an online converter such as this one. The result is: AC 44 . Note that this result comprises two bytes and is encoded big endian (most significant byte first). Make sure the result is padded to the correct byte size. If the field in the header is 4 bytes, we have to add two zero bytes at the beginning: 00 00 AC 44 Reverse the byte order: 44 AC 00 00 . The result is now little endian (least significant byte first), as required by the wave header specification.

To confirm, you can open a working wave file with 44,100 Hz sample rate in a hex editor and check bytes 25-28, which will contain 44 AC 00 00 .

Using Wave Recovery Tool to Restore the Wave File Headers

Because quite many files were damaged in our case, I did not want to fix all wave headers manually. Therefore, I developed a program which can fix the wave files all at once. Wave Recovery Tool is available on github and is published under the terms of the GNU General Public Licence.

Conclusion

This post reveals a serious bug in Logic, which can potentially destroy hours and weeks of hard work. Fortunately, the data can be restored completely either manually or using a Wave Recovery Tool I developed. I seriously hope that this bug will be fixed soon or is already fixed in recent versions of Logic.

Notes Regarding AIFF Files

In this blog post, I demonstrated the issue by means of wave file header structures. The same can be done for AIFF files, however the header structure is more complex. The good news: I extended Wave Recovery Tool and now it is also possible to restore AIFF files under certain conditions.

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